Booklist: Celebrating Hispanic Heritage!

It’s almost the end of Hispanic Heritage month, but there’s still time to  celebrate, with a book!  If you get a chance, check out our display, on the shelves when you first come into the library.

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celebrating-hispanic-heritage-graphic

PICTURE BOOKS (J PIC)

Aardema, Verna. Pedro and the Padre.
In this Mexican folktale, a lazy boy learns a lesson about lying.

Alvarez, Julia. The Secret Footprints.
A story based on Dominican folklore about the ciguapas, a tribe of beautiful underwater people whose feet are attached backwards, with their toes pointing in the direction from which they have come.

Andrews-Goebel, Nancy. The Pot That Juan Built.
Juan Quezada is the premier potter in Mexico. Using local materials and the primitive methods of the Casas Grandes people, Juan creates stunning pots in the traditional style, each a work of art unlike any other.

Brown, Monica. Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match.
Try as she might, in a world where everyone tries to put this biracial, Peruvian-Scottish-American girl into a box, Marisol McDonald doesn’t match. And that’s just fine with her.

Dorros, Arthur. Isla.
A young girl and her grandmother take an imaginary journey to the Caribbean island where her mother grew up and where some of her family still lives.

Elya, Susan Middleton. Little Roja Riding Hood.
While Roja picks flowers on the way to her grandma’s, a mean wolf sneaks away with her cape to surprise Abuelita. But Grandma’s no fool and Roja’s no ordinary chica. They send that hungry lobo packing with a caliente surprise!

Engle, Margarita. Drum Dream Girl.
Follows a young Cuban girl in the 1930s as she strives to become a drummer, despite being continually reminded that only boys play the drums, and that there’s never been a female drummer in Cuba.

Flora, James. The Fabulous Firework Family.
A Mexican family prepares a grand fireworks display for the festival of the village’s patron saint. With illustrations labeled in Spanish.

Johnston, Tony. The Iguana Brothers.
Dom and Tom, the iguana brothers, eat flowers, pretend to be dinosaurs, and discover that they can be best friends.

—. Isabel’s House of Butterflies.
Eight-year-old Isabel hopes that her plan will spare her favorite tree, keep the butterflies coming, and provide an income for her poor family in Mexico.

—. My Abuelita.
With great gusto, a child’s grandmother performs deep knee bends, consumes a breakfast of “huevos estrellados,” and practices vocal exercises before going to work as a storyteller.

Keats, Ezra Jack. Roberto Walks Home.
Roberto is thrilled that his older brother Miguel is going to walk him home from school. But when Miguel forgets and shoots hoops with his friends instead, Roberto is mad and has to walk alone. How will Miguel make it up to Roberto?

Kimmel, Eric. The Runaway Tortilla.
In Texas, Tia Lupe and Tio Jose make the best tortillas — so light that the cowboys say they just might jump right off the griddle. One day, a tortilla does just that.

—. The Three Cabritos.
Once upon a time three cabritos (little goats) decide to go to a Mexican fiesta. But their mother is worried. She warns them about Chupacabra, the goat-sucker who lives beneath the bridge. And sure enough, as the goats cross the bridge, he jumps out!

Lattimore, Deborah. The Flame of Peace. (PB)
To prevent the outbreak of war, a young Aztec boy must outwit nine evil lords of the night to obtain the flame of peace from Lord Morning Star.

Manning, Maurie. Kitchen Dance.
Two sleepy children sneak out of their beds to watch as their parents, who love each other very much, break into a dance while washing the dishes.

Markun, Patricia Maloney. The Little Painter of Sabana Grande.
Lacking paper, a young Panamanian artist paints the outside of his adobe home.

Medina, Meg. Mango, Abuela, and Me.
The night she arrives, Mia tries to share her favorite book with Abuela before they go to sleep and discovers that Abuela can’t read the words inside. So while they cook, Mia helps Abuela learn English (“Dough. Masa“), and Mia learns some Spanish too, but it’s still hard for Abuela to learn the words she needs to tell Mia all her stories.

Montes, Marisa. Los Gatos Black on Halloween.
Under October’s luna, full and bright, the monsters are throwing a ball in the Haunted Hall. Las brujas come on their broomsticks. Los muertos rise from their coffins to join in the fun. Los esqueletos rattle their bones as they dance through the door. And the scariest creatures of all aren’t even there yet!

—. Juan Bobo Goes to Work.
Although he tries to do exactly as his mother tells him, foolish Juan Bobo keeps getting things all wrong.

Mora, Pat. Abuelos.
Young Ray and Amelia move to a new village and experience the fright and fun of “los abuelos” for the first time, a tradition from northern New Mexico. In the cold months of midwinter, village men disappear to disguise themselves as scary old men and then descend on the children, teasing them and asking if they’ve been good.

—. Book Fiesta!
Children read aloud in various settings to celebrate of El día de los niños, or Children’s Day, in this bilingual story. Includes facts about Mexico’s annual celebration of children and the book fiestas that are often included.

—. Gracias.
A young multiracial boy celebrates family, friendship, and fun by telling about some of the everyday things for which he is thankful.

Morales, Yuyi. Just in Case: A Trickster Tale and Spanish Alphabet Book.
As Senor Calavera prepares for Grandma Beetle’s birthday he finds an alphabetical assortment of unusual presents, but with the help of Zelmiro the Ghost, he finds the best gift of all.

—. Niño Wrestles the World.
Lucha Libre champion Niño has no trouble fending off monstrous opponents, but when his little sisters awaken from their naps, he is in for a no-holds-barred wrestling match that will truly test his skills.

Soto, Gary. Too Many Tamales.
Maria tries on her mother’s wedding ring while helping make tamales for a Christmas family get-together. Panic ensues when hours later, she realizes the ring is missing.

Tafolla, Carmen. Fiesta Babies.
These Fiesta Babies dance, march on parade, and sing along to mariachi songs in their spirited celebration of fiestas.  From piñatas to flower coronas, little ones are introduced to the many colorful aspects of an important and lively Latino cultural tradition.

Thong, Roseanne Greenfield. Green is a Chile Pepper.
Children discover a world of colors all around them. Many of the featured objects are Latino in origin, but all are universal in appeal.

Tonatiuh, Duncan. Dear Primo: A Letter to My Cousin.
Two cousins, one in Mexico and one in New York City, write to each other and learn that even though their daily lives differ, at heart the boys are very similar.

—. Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote: A Migrant’s Tale.
When Papa Rabbit does not return home as expected from many seasons of working in the great carrot and lettuce fields of El Norte, his son Pancho sets out on a dangerous trek to find him, guided by a coyote.

Vamos, Samantha. The Cazuela that the Farm Maiden Stirred.
A cumulative tale of a farm maiden who, aided by a group of animals, prepares “arroz con Leche,” or rice pudding.

Velasquez, Eric. Grandma’s Gift.
After they prepare their traditional Puerto Rican celebration, Eric and Grandma visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a school project, where he sees a painting by Diego Velasquez and realizes for the first time that he could be an artist when he grows up.

—. Looking for Bongo.
When a boy’s abuela accuses him of being careless with his beloved Bongo, he devises a trap and catches the toy thief red-handed.

Yacowitz, Caryn.  Pumpkin Fiesta.
Hoping to win a prize for the best pumpkin at the fiesta, Foolish Fernando tries to copy Old Juana’s successful gardening techniques, but without really watching to see how much effort and love she puts into her work. Includes a recipe for pumpkin soup.

FAIRY & FOLK TALES

Aardema, Verna. Borreguita and the Coyote. (J 398.2 AAR)
What’s a little lamb to do about a fierce coyote that wants to eat her? Why, trick him, of course… and trick him again…and trick him one more time!

Gerson, Mary-Joan.  Fiesta Femenina. (J 398.2 GER)
A collection of folktales from various cultures in Mexico, all focusing on the important roles of women, such as Rosha, a young girl who rescues the sun; the goddess Tangu Yuh; Kesne, a Zapotec princess; and the Virgin Mary.

—. People of Corn. (J 398.2 GER)
After several unsuccessful attempts to create grateful creatures, the Mayan gods use sacred corn to fashion a people who will thank and praise their creators.

Hayes, Joe. Juan Verdades: The Man Who Couldn’t Tell a Lie. (J 398.2 HAY)
A wealthy rancher is so certain of the honesty of his foreman that he wagers his ranch.

Hayes, Joe. La Llorona: The Weeping Woman. (J 398.2097 MOR)
Retells, in parallel English and Spanish text, the traditional Hispanic American tale of a proud and beautiful woman who, in a fit of jealousy, commits a terrible act and then cannot stop weeping for it, even after she is dead.

Kimmel, Eric. The Lady in the Blue Cloak. (J 398.2 KIM)
A collection of stories depicting the history of seven Texas missions from the 17th century to the 19th century.

—. The Two Mountains: An Aztec Legend. (J 398.2089 KIM)
Two married gods disobey their orders and visit Earth. They are turned into mortals as punishment and eventually become mountains so that they will always stand side by side.

Lamadrid, Enrique. Juan the Bear and the Water of Life. (J 398.2 LAM)
Although treated as outcasts, three superhuman friends, including Juan del Oso, whose father was a bear, create an irrigation system for New Mexico’s Mora Valley.

Lilly, Melinda. The Moon People. (J 398.208 LIL)
The moon people use a cloud bridge to travel to the Earth, a messy but beautiful world of incredible variety that becomes their new home.

—.  The Snake’s Toothache. (J 398.208 LIL)
An old witch who lives in a cave in a volcano with a fiery snake uses her wits to keep the serpent from destroying her village.

—. Song of the Sun. (J 398.209 LIL)
Eagle Warrior tries to find a way to free his fellow musicians who have been captured by the jealous Sun because they have only honored the Spirit of Night.

Mora, Pat. The Night the Moon Fell. (J 398.2 MOR)
When a gust from her grandfather’s blowgun causes Luna to tumble from the sky and fall into the ocean, the little fishes help her rise once again, in an updated retelling of a traditional Mopan Maya myth from Belize.

Palacios, Argentina. The Llama’s Secret. (J 398.21 P)
A Peruvian rendition of the Great Flood story, in which a llama warns the people and animals to seek shelter on Huillcacato to avoid the rising sea, Mamacocha.

Parker, Robert Andrew.  The Monkey’s Haircut. (J 398.2 BIE)
A collection of twenty-two traditional tales from the Mayas, including “How Christ Was Chased” and “The Corn in the Rock.”

Philip, Neil. Horse Hooves and Chicken Feet. (J 398.2 HOR)
This unique collection of fifteen folktales draws on the rich storytelling tradition of Mexico’s people and culture. Lively retellings and vibrant, whimsical paintings, based on Mexican folk art, make these spirited tales a perfect introduction to this little-known body of folk literature.

Storace, Patricia. Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel. (J 398.2 STO)
You live in a tower without a stair, Sugar Cane, Sugar Cane, let down your hair. Stolen away from her parents on her first birthday by island sorceress Madam Fate, beautiful Sugar Cane grows up in a tower overlooking the sea.

Wood, Nancy. The Girl Who Loved Coyotes: Stories of the Southwest. (J 398.2 WOO)
Contains twelve original tales based on folklore that combine elements from Native American, Spanish, and Anglo cultures and focus on the Southwest, coyotes, and magic.

NONFICTION

 Ada, Alma Flor. Pio Peep! (J 461 PIO)
A collection of more than two dozen nursery rhymes in Spanish, from Spain and Latin America, with English translations.

Alarcon, Francisco X. Iguanas in the Snow. (J 811.54 ALA)
This collection of poems invites young readers to celebrate winter at the seashore, in San Francisco and in the redwood forests of the Sierras.

Ancona, George. ¡Olé flamenco! (J 793.3 ANC)
Flamenco: it’s dancing, it’s singing, it’s guitar playing! It’s a way of expressing oneself that has evolved from many influences over hundreds of years. In Santa Fe, New Mexico, we meet Janira Cordova, the youngest member of a company studying to perform flamenco.

Brown, Monica. My Name is Gabito: The Life of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. (J 468 BRO)
As a boy, Gabito had the ability to imagine many things. He lived in a small house with a large family. He would grow up to become a writer known as Gabriel García Márquez.

Engle, Margarita. The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom.       (J 811.54 ENG)
Cuba has fought three wars for independence, and still she is not free. This history in verse creates a lyrical portrait of Cuba.

Gonzalez, Lucia. The Storyteller’s Candle. (J 468 GON)
During the early days of the Great Depression, New York City’s first Puerto Rican librarian, Pura Belpré, introduces the public library to immigrants living in El Barrio and hosts the neighborhood’s first Three Kings’ Day fiesta.

Morales, Yuyi. Viva Frida. (J 468 MOR)
Frida Kahlo, one of the world’s most famous and unusual artists is revered around the world. Her life was filled with laughter, love, and tragedy, all of which influenced what she painted on her canvases.

Petrillo, Valerie. A Kid’s Guide to Latino History. (J 973.0468 PET)
Features more than 50 hands-on activities, games, and crafts that explore the diversity of Latino culture and teach children about the people, experiences, and events that have shaped Hispanic American history.

Rosario, Idalia. Idalia’s Project ABC. (J 468.6 ROS)
Introduces the alphabet by means of brief bilingual descriptions of city life.

Schmidt, Gary D. Martin de Porres: The Rose in the Desert. (J 282.092 SCH)
As the illegitimate son of a Spanish nobleman and a former slave, Martin de Porres was born into extreme poverty. Even so, his mother begged the church fathers to allow him into the priesthood. Instead, Martin was accepted as a servant boy. But soon, the young man was performing miracles.

Tafolla, Carmen. What Can You Do With a Rebozo? (J 468 TAF)
A spunky young girl explains the many uses of her mother’s red rebozo, a traditional Mexican woven shawl.

Tonatiuh, Duncan. Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation. (J 379.2 TON)
Years before the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez, an eight-year-old girl of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage, played an instrumental role in Mendez v. Westminster, the landmark desegregation case of 1946 in California.

Zepeda, Gwendolyn. Growing Up with Tamales. (J 468 ZEP)
Six-year-old Ana looks forward to growing older and being allowed more responsibility in making the tamales for the family’s Christmas celebrations.

CHAPTER BOOKS and FICTION

 Agosin, Marjorie. I Lived on Butterfly Hill. (J FIC)
Eleven-year-old Celeste Marconi is a dreamer, a writer, a collector of words. But then a new whispered word trickles into her life: “Subversives.” Her beloved country of Chile has been taken over by a military dictatorship, and subversives — people considered a threat to the new government — are in increasing danger.

American Girl series. Josefina. (J SERIES)
Nine-year-old Josefina, the youngest of four sisters living in New Mexico in 1824, tries to help run the household after her mother dies.

 Bulla, Clyde Robert. The Paint Brush Kid. (J CHP)
Nine-year-old Gregory paints pictures representing the life of the Mexican American old man known as Uncle Pancho and attempts to save him from losing his house.

Cameron, Ann. The Most Beautiful Place in the World. (J FIC)
Growing up with his grandmother in a small Guatemalan town, seven-year-old Juan discovers the value of hard work, the joy of learning, and the location of the most beautiful place in the world.

Fleischman, Sid. Bandit’s Moon. (J FIC)
Twelve-year-old Annyrose relates her adventures with Joaquín Murieta and his band of outlaws in the California gold-mining region during the mid-1800s.

Flood, Pansie Hart. It’s Test Day, Tiger Turcotte. (J CHP)
Already so worried about the big second grade test that his stomach is upset, seven-year-old Tiger Turcotte, whose parents are African American, Meherrin Indian, and Hispanic, gets stuck on the question about race.

Jennings, Patrick. Faith and the Electric Dogs. (J PBK)
Because Faith hates her new life in Mexico, she and her faithful mutt, Edison, flee by rocket and find adventures which cause her to have a change of heart.

Jules, Jacqueline. Zapato Power series (J CHP)
Freddie finds a mysterious package outside his apartment containing sneakers that allow him to run faster than a train, and inspire him to perform heroic deeds.

Lord, Cynthia. A Handful of Stars. (J FIC)
When her blind dog slips his collar, twelve-year old Lily meets Salma Santiago, a young Hispanic girl whose migrant family are in Maine for the blueberry-picking season, and, based partly on their mutual love of dogs, the two forge a friendship while painting bee boxes for Lily’s grandfather–but as the Blueberry Queen pageant approaches Lily and Selma are confronted with some of the hard truths of prejudice and migrant life.

Mikaelson, Ben.  Sparrow Hawk Red. (J FIC & J PBK)
Thirteen-year-old Ricky, the Mexican American son of a former Drug Enforcement Agency man, tries to avenge his mother’s murder by crossing over into Mexico to steal a high-tech radar plane from drug smugglers.

Ryan, Pam Munoz.  Becoming Naomi Leon. (J FIC)
When Naomi’s absent mother resurfaces to claim her, Naomi runs away to Mexico with her great-grandmother and younger brother in search of her father.

 —. The Dreamer. (J FIC)
A fictionalized biography of the Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, who grew up a painfully shy child, ridiculed by his overbearing father, but who became one of the most widely-read poets in the world.

—.  Esperanza Rising. (J PBK)
Esperanza and her mother are forced to leave their life of wealth and privilege in Mexico to go work in the labor camps of Southern California, where they must adapt to the harsh circumstances facing Mexican farm workers on the eve of the Great Depression.

—.  Riding Freedom. (J FIC & J PBK)
A fictionalized account of Charley (Charlotte) Parkhurst who ran away from an orphanage, posed as a boy, moved to California, and fooled everyone by her appearance.

Stanley, Diane.  Elena. (J FIC)
A Mexican American girl recounts how her mother moved the family to America during the Mexican Revolution.

Wojciechowska, Maia. Shadow of a Bull. (J FIC)
Manolo Olivar has to make a decision: to follow in his famous father’s shadow and become a bullfighter, or to follow his heart and become a doctor.

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Thanks to Casey, for helping prepare this list!

February New Books!

We added lots of new books in February.  Here are a few of my favorites that I grabbed off the cart!

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PICTURE BOOKS:

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naptime with Theo and BeauNaptime with Theo & Beau
by Jessica Shyba

Theo is the puppy, Beau is the little boy.  When Beau was about a year old, he and his brother and sister asked for a puppy for Christmas.  A few months later, Theo came into their lives, adopted from a shelter.

From the moment they met, Theo and Beau were best friends.  And like all friends, they like to do things together.  Like nap!  Every day, Theo waits for Beau to fall asleep.  When he does, Theo is sleepy too!  So Beau’s mom Hoists him up on the bed, Theo plops himself on top of Beau, and they nap together for a couple hours.  With simple, descriptive text, this book shows some of the best pictures of their naps together.

I have to admit, I fell in love with the pictures of Theo and Beau online, and I follow the author’s blog: Momma’s Gone City.  There’s something special between this boy and his dog, and I hope to see pictures of Theo and Beau continue.

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Dear mr washingtonDear Mr. Washington
by Lynn Cullen, Pictures by Nancy Carpenter

Charlotte and James  and their little brother, Baby John, have promised to be on their best behavior while President George Washington comes to sit for a portrait to be painted by their father, Gilbert Stuart.   But when he comes, Baby John chews his hair ribbon, James chases their cat  up Mr. Washington’s shoulder, and Charlotte is caught spying, because she just wanted to see if the president could smile.

After the disastrous first visit, Mr. Washington sends the Stuart children a copy of his book of manners, and Charlotte, being a very polite little girl,  writes her thanks and apologies in a series of letters.  The text of this book is those letters, with illustrations showing how things *really* went.

I love this book!  The expressions on both the children and the adults’ faces; the exuberance of Charlotte, James and Baby John as they try to impress and befriend the imposing Mr. Washington, the despair of the parents as everything goes completely wrong, the illustrations of children’s interpretation of Mr. Washington’s Rules for Good Behavior, (with guest appearances from Benjamin Franklin, Martha Washington and Thomas Jefferson).  Based on a true event, described in a brief afterword, this is a perfect way to meet George Washington for young readers.

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FAIRY TALES:

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Little Red Riding HoodLittle Red Riding Hood
By the Brothers Grimm, Illustrated by Sybille Schenker, Translated by Anthea Bell

This beautiful new take on an old tale is a stunning read.

Based the tale from the Brothers Grimm, and translated from the German, the retelling of Little Red Riding Hood (called Little Red Cap in this version) is the older, traditional version of the tale.  Grandma does get eaten, as does Little Red, and the Huntsman shows up to kill the wolf in a rather gruesome way and save the day.

But the illustrations!  They are so beautifully done.  Cut-paper illustrations allow the reader to look through the woods to try to see what is happening on the next page.  And then, when you turn the page, looking back where you’ve been is almost better.  Black and red feature heavily in the color scheme, which is appropriate for Little Red and the Wolf.

I wouldn’t give this to a very young child, as the pages with the cuts are quite delicate.  But if you’re looking for a way to share Little Red Riding Hood with your child, this is a wonderful way to do it.

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classic bedtime storiesClassic Bedtime Stories
Illustrated by Scott Gustafson

Includes favorites like The Country Mouse and the City Mouse, The Tortoise and the Hair, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, The Story of Little Sambha and the Tigers, and Sleeping Beauty.

Wonderful re-tellings, with even more wonderful illustrations.  If you’re looking for a collection of tales to share with your child at bedtime, where they can pour over the pictures while you read the stories.

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NON-FICTION:

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Two New Series: National Geographic Kids Chapters and DK’s Eyewonder

Tiger in TroubleTiger in Trouble: And More True Stories of Amazing Animal Rescues
By Kelly Milner Halls

This series features special animals–but all of them have captured the attention of the public in one way or another!  Some are great escape artists, some have poignant stories of survival, some are strong rescuers.  All are unforgettable.  Each book features three animals and the people who care for them.

In Tiger in Trouble, you’ll meet Nitro, a tiger kept as a pet in a small cage who no one knew was blind, Etheral, a baby albino bat whose white fur made it impossible for her to catch food, and Suzie, Bob and Caleb, three Vervet monkeys each raised as a pet who had to come together to be a family.

This series is perfect for second and third grader readers who love animals.

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piratesPirates
by Deborah Lock

Every fact you wanted to know about pirates for kids!

This series is similar to the Eyewitness books, but for a slightly younger audience.  Well researched, with great photographs and illustrations.  The Eyewonder series also features some fun activities and games, as well as a facts check-up, glossary and index at the end of the book.

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FICTION:

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Smek for presidentSmek for President
By Adam Rex

I haven’t read it yet, but I can’t wait!  A sequel to one of my favorite books (and my favorite audio book of all time) The True Meaning of Smekday

Tip and J.Lo are apparently back for another hilarious intergalactic adventure, getting their former car/now spaceship Slushious out of mothballs and heading to New Boovworld to clear J.Lo’s name.  But with J.Lo dubbed Public Enemy Number One and Captain Smek out to capture him to prove his worth as the future president, it won’t be as easy as they thought.

The True Meaning of Smekday has been adapted into a film coming out this year called Home.  Read the book or listen to the audio book before you see the film though.  There’s no way it can be anywhere near as good!

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If you want more information on these books, or if you want a different new book to read, visit the library and ask a librarian for help.

As always, Happy Reading!

::Kelly::

 

More Favorite New Books – January!

Another new cart of books…more new favorites!

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Gingerbread for Liberty: How a German Baker Helped Win the American Revolution, by Mara Rockliff, Pictures by Vincent X. Kirsch
gingerbread for libertyOnce there was a baker who lived in Philadelphia.  He was a big man, with a booming laugh, and a recipe for delicious gingerbread.  He also loved his country.  So when the American Revolution started, this baker knew he had to help somehow.  And he did!

This is a short picture book  based on the life of Christopher Ludwick, a German baker who is an forgotten hero of the Revolution.  There is a brief author’s note in the back that gives a few details of his life, and what he did after the Revolution.  He was a very interesting person, and I wish there was more information about his life.

The illustrations are wonderful–they look like gingerbread cookies!  And the book also includes Christopher Ludwick’s recipe for gingerbread.

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When Otis Courted Mama, by Kathi Appelt, Illustrated by Jill McElmurry
when otis courted mamaBefore Otis, Cardell had a mostly wonderful life.  He had a perfectly good mama and a perfectly good daddy who adored him.  Also a perfectly nice stepmama, Lulu, and a perfectly cute stepbrother, Little Frankie, who also adored him.

The only problem is that his perfectly good daddy and perfectly nice stepmama and perfectly cute stepbrother live on the other side of the desert. And his perfectly good mama, who is wonderfully busy, is quite impressed when their new neighbor, Otis, comes visiting.  With flowers.

A perfectly adorable story about a growing family, with Cardell right in the middle of a lot of love.  And the illustrations are wonderful!

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Hot Dog! Eleanor Roosevelt Throws a Picnic, by Leslie Kimmelman, Illustrated by Victor Juhasz
Hot Dog!Eleanor Roosevelt loved hot dogs!  But as the wife of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, her parties usually featured fancier dishes.

In 1939, the King and Queen of England were coming for a visit…the first British royalty to visit the United States since the American Revolution!  Eleanor promptly decided to host an all-American picnic…with hot dogs!

This story of two special couples and their memorable picnic is both enjoyable and true.  An afterword provides more details, along with the information on a 50th anniversary celebration that took place in 1989.

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Winnie: the True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh, By Sally M. Walker, Illustrated by Jonathan D. Voss
WinnieWhen Harry Colebourn looked out the train window and saw a baby bear on the station platform, he had to investigate!  He bought the bear for twenty dollars, named her Winnipeg, and took the baby bear with him to his military training camp at Valcartier, in Quebec.

Harry and Winnie had a wonderful time playing games at the camp with each other and the other soldiers in training while Harry took care of the horses. When the captain received orders that the troop was to go to England, Harry couldn’t leave Winnie behind, so she joined the regiment on their long trip to England.

But a bear couldn’t be brought on the front lines, and Winnie was left at the London Zoo, where she met a boy named Christopher Robin.  And a story was born…  With an afterword on the lives of Winnie and Harry, and photographs!

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A Million Ways Home, By Dianna Dorisi Winget
million ways homePoppy Parker was a perfectly ordinary girl living with her grandmother.  Then Grandma Beth ends up in the hospital after a stroke, and Poppy ends up in foster care.  Poppy has a plan to spring Grandma Beth from the nursing home, so the two of them can go home and stay in their apartment, where Poppy can take care of her.

But Poppy’s big escape ends in disaster when she’s in the wrong place at the wrong time.  Suddenly, the police have put her in protective custody, staying with Marti, the mother of Officer Brannigan, the policeman who helped her.  Living with Marti is much better than the foster facility.  Poppy meets a new friend, finds a dog in need of even more help than she is, and tries to come up with another plan to rescue Grandma Beth.

This is a quick read about a plucky girl.  There’s a lot going on, and the resolution, while not completely happy, is very hopeful.  A great middle-grade book for dog lovers and kids who like adventure and family stories.

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Other new books in this release that people will enjoy (but that I haven’t read…yet.)

lyla and mylaLila and Myla, the Twins Fairies, by Daisy Meadows

A Rainbow Magic Special edition.

Jack Frost has stolen Myla And Lila’s twin magic…and Kirsty and Rachel have to help them!

 

sleeping beauty dreams bigSleeping Beauty Dreams Big, by Joan Holub & Suzanne Williams

Grimmtastic Girls #5

Daredevil Sleeping Beauty–or Rose, to her friends–knows that she has to avoid sharp objects after her 12th birthday.  But at Grimm Academy, that’s not as easy as it sounds!

 

big nates greatest hits Big Nate’s Greatest Hits, by Lincoln Peirce

Just what it says–Big Nate’s most popular episodes, collected together for the first time!

 

 

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As always, if you would like to find one of these books, click on the title for a link to the Minuteman Library Network Catalog, or stop by the library!  In the meantime, read, read, read!

On Monday, the American Library Association will be announcing the winners of the biggest book awards for kids and teens: the Caldecott, the Newbery and the Prinz Awards, along with the Coretta Scott King, the Schneider Family Book Award, the Seibert and several more.   We’re looking forward to it!

::Kelly::

 

New Year, New Books!

We just added a cart of new books for January.  Here are a few of my favorites!

Picture Books

The Bear Ate Your Sandwich, by Julia Sarcone-Roach

bear ate your sandwich  “By now I think you know what happened to your sandwich.  But you may not know how it happened.  So let me tell you.

It all started with the bear.”

Read all about this bear and how it came into a neighborhood from the woods and just happened upon the beautiful and delicious sandwich, all alone.  Of course it ate it!

Or is that REALLY the way it happened..?

You may see the surprise ending coming, or you may not.  Either way, this is a great story to read aloud to kids of all ages.

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Sick Simon, by Dan Krall

sick simonSimon loves school!  He looks forward to going every day.  Even the day when he’s sneezing, coughing, his nose is dripping green goo.  He feeds the class chinchilla, shares his snacks with friends, and passes around his stuffed toy for show and tell.  But by Wednesday, his classmates are running away from him.  By Friday, he’s the only one on the bus.

And that’s when the germs show up, to tell him he’s their hero.  Simon may have to change his thinking about some things…

A funny look at why going out in public with a cold isn’t the best idea.  The illustrations may be a little hard to look at (the green goo made my stomach churn!) but the resolution will make everyone–kids, parents, teachers, librarians–happy.

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The Storm Whale, by Benji Davies

storm whaleNoi and his Dad live with their six cats by the sea.

One day, when Noi’s Dad goes out in his fishing boat, Noi finds a small whale washed up on the beach.

Can he save it?

I loved the illustrations in this deceptively simple story.  I think you’ll love it too.

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Non-Fiction

Earmuffs for Everyone!  How Chester Greenwood Became Known as the Inventor of Earmuffs, by Meghan McCarthy

Earmuffs for everyoneIt seems like such a simply idea…a cap to keep your ears warm in the winter.  And yet…the story is a lot more complicated than that.

Every year in Farmington Maine, there’s a parade commemorating Chester Greenwood, the inventor of earmuffs.  But did he really invent them?  Or did he perfect an idea that was floating around out there?

Read this book and find out!

I love Megan McCarthy’s books.  She finds something intriguing and investigates.  Whether it’s chewing gum (Pop!) or famous individuals (Seabiscuit, the Wonder Horse)  or earmuffs, her interesting facts and wonderfully funny pictures make for a great quick and interesting read.

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The Whale Who Won Hearts: and More True Stories of Adventures with Animals, by Brian Skerry

whale who won heartsBrian Skerry is a underwater photographer with National Geographic Magazine.  He grew up in Massachusetts, not far from here.  The Whale Who Won Hearts book is one of the new National Geographic Kids Chapters, a series designed for second and third grade readers interested in nature.

The book contains four different underwater stories involving leatherback turtles, harp seals, a beluga whale (on the cover) and coral reef sharks.  The stories are quick reads, and very interesting.  The photographs are wonderful.

If you have a budding naturalist, share this book with them.  And look up the other books in the series too!

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And, on a more serious note

Red Madness: How a Medical Mystery Changed What We Eat, by Gail Jarrow

red madnessHave you ever heard of Pellagra?  I hadn’t.  Apparently, it was a disease that wiped out millions of people across the world.  No one really knew what caused it, and no one knew how to treat it.  Some people didn’t even know it existed…until someone they loved came down with the deadly illness.

When people across the American South started appearing in their local doctor’s offices with a red rash on their hands and feet, it was worrisome.  When it started spreading, and people started dying, doctors started calling it an epidemic.  No one knew what caused the rash, that started small and soon spread up extremities and across people’s faces.  No one could tell who would live and who would die. Nor could anyone decide why some people died and some seemed to get the disease every year, recover and come down with it again.

At first, doctors thought that corn somehow caused the disease, but through experimentation found that wasn’t true.  There was a link though, and health officials were determined to find out what was going on.

From the 1900 to the 1940s, Pellagra caused thousands of deaths, along with madness and debilitating health hazards each year.  Now, hardly anyone knows what it is, or even what cures it.  But every day, you eat something that will keep it at bay.  Find out what it is in this well-researched and intriguing book.  You will be fascinated.

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And a few I haven’t read yet, but I want to, as soon as I clear some space in my TBR (to be read) pile!

Chapter Books:

Heidi Heckelbeck is not a thiefHeidi Heckelbeck Is Not a Thief!  By Wanda Coven

Heidi Heckelbeck’s 13th adventure!  When her best friend’s special pen goes missing, what’s a little witch to do?  Look in her Magic Book of Spells, of course!

 

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owl diaries eva's treetopOwl Diaries: Eva’s Treetop Festival,  By Rebecca Elliot

The first book in a new chapter-book series about Eva Wingdale, a little owl with big ideas!

 

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Fiction:

wollstonecraft Detective AgencyThe Wollstonecraft Detective Agency, Book One: The Case of the Missing Moonstone,  By Jordan Stratford

Just look at that cover!  Detectives, two girls in a hot air balloon, a spyglass…what’s not to love?  A made up story about two real people: Ada Byron, the world’s first computer grogrammer and Mary Shelley, the word’s first science-fiction author.  This adventurous mystery looks to be a lot of fun to read!

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Story ThievesStory Thieves, by James Riley

Another great cover!  Owen’s a normal kid with normal problems, until he sees his classmate Bethany emerging from inside a book!  Turns out that Bethany is half fictional, and she’s looking for her missing father inside probable titles.  Owen promises not to tell…IF Bethany will take him inside his favorite series to meet his favorite character.  Of course, things don’t work out quite as planned, and soon Owen and Bethany are in trouble and on the run.

From the author of the wonderful Half Upon a Time, Twice Upon a Time and Once Upon the End, this is a book I’ve been waiting to read since I heard it was being written!

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So…if you’re looking for something new to read, try one of these titles.  I think you’ll be happy that you did!

::Kelly::

Book Display Newsletter – Thanksgiving!

It’s a busy time, getting ready for Thanksgiving!  With travel, cooking and no school, sometimes kids are looking for something to do.  Stop by and try some books from our Thanksgiving display.  Pilgrim Bella and Wampanoag friend Koko are just sitting on top of a treasure of stories and information about the Thanksgiving Holiday and the history behind it.

If you can’t get into the library right now, here’s our November Newsletter, featuring Thanksgiving books, a fun recipe, and a craft to try at home:

monthly newsletter Nov 13 thankgiving

And if you want more books for older readers on what life was like on Plymouth Plantation, try our earlier post about Life in Massachusetts in 1620.  Bella Approves.

bella pilgrim

Happy Thanksgiving!
::Kelly::

Booklist: Holiday Gift-giving Ideas…Non-Fiction for Kids!

And we continue with a few more ideas for gift giving this holiday season.  These books are non-fiction; information and poetry books for kids of all ages.  Pair one of these selections with something that will help a child use the book…origami paper and scissors to go with our first title, a stuffed animal or writing journal to go with one of the poetry selections!

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2012 Holiday Gift Ideas!

Non-Fiction and Poetry for kids:

star wars origamiStar Wars Origami: 36 Amazing Paper-Folding Projects from a Galaxy Far, Far Away  by Chris Alexander
Kids love origami—and what could be cooler than transforming a piece of paper into Boba Fett, Princess Leia, Yoda, or R2-D2? And not just any paper, but custom-designed paper illustrated with art from the movies. Star Wars® Origami marries the fun of paper folding with the obsession of Star Wars.  Pair this with one of Tom Angleberger’s Origami Yoda books for the perfect gift!

water sings blueWater Sings Blue by Kate Coombs, illustrated by Melio So
Come down to the shore with this rich and vivid celebration of the ocean! With watercolors gorgeous enough to wade in by award-winning artist Meilo So and playful, moving poems by Kate Coombs, Water Sings Blue evokes the beauty and power, the depth and mystery, and the endless resonance of the sea.  The perfect selection for any family visiting the beach…now or in the summer!

step gently outStep Gently Out by Helen Frost and Rick Lieder
What would happen if you walked very, very quietly and looked ever so carefully at the natural world outside? You might see a cricket leap, a moth spread her wings, or a spider step across a silken web. In simple, evocative language, Helen Frost offers a hint at the many tiny creatures around us. And in astonishing close-up photographs, Rick Lieder captures the glint of a katydid’s eye, the glow of a firefly, and many more living wonders just awaiting discovery. Fascinating facts about all the creatures pictured may be found at the end.

forget me notsForget-Me-Nots: Poems to Learn by Heart by Mary Ann Hoberman, Illustrated by Michael Emberley
From the creators of the bestselling You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You series comes this new collection of poems especially suitable for learning by heart and saying aloud. With personal introductions by former Children’s Poet Laureate Mary Ann Hoberman — as well as her own time-tested tips and tools for memorization and recitation — and vivid illustrations by Michael Emberley featuring his trademark wit and lively characters, Forget-Me-Nots includes more than 120 works from both classic and contemporary poets, from childhood favorites to lesser-known treasures. This anthology should definitely inspire a love of learning poetry!

national geographic book of animal poetryNational Geographic Book of Animal Poetry: 200 Poems with Photographs that Squeak, Soar and Roar! Edited by J. Patrick Lewis
What could be better than cuddling up with your child and this book on your lap and allowing your imaginations to soar with the words and images? Lovingly selected by U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis and paired with vibrant animal photography, this collection of poems is an exuberant celebration of the animal kingdom and a beautiful introduction to poetry. Designed for family sharing but targeted to ages 4-8, this dynamic, fresh, and classic collection of animal poems is a must-have for the family bookshelf.

lego ideas bookThe Lego Ideas Book by Daniel Lipkowitz
Now with The LEGO Ideas Book, you can take what you already have and make something new! The book is divided into six themed chapters—transportation, buildings, space, kingdoms, adventure, and useful makes—each with basic templates of key models and spreads to inspire you to create your own.  Hints and tips from Master Builders can help you turn your classic car into a race car or add a bridge to your castle! Don’t be concerned if you haven’t got all the bricks you need: this book also shows how to simplify details, making this a great user-friendly guide for any building ability.  Pair with a Ninjago book or kit!

one times square a centuryOne Times Square: A Century of Change at the Crossroads of the World by Joe McKendry
One Times Square explores the story of this fascinating intersection, starting when Broadway was a mere dirt path known as Bloomingdale Road, through the district’s decades of postwar decay, to its renewal as a glittering tourist-friendly media mecca. McKendry’s meticulous, lush watercolors take readers behind the famous Camel billboard to find out how it blew smoke rings over the square for 25 years, to the top of the Times Tower to see how the New Year’s ball has made its descent for over 100 years, and onto construction sites as buildings grow up around One Times Square to dwarf what once ranked among the tallest buildings in the world.

life in the oceanLife in the Ocean: The Story of Oceanographer Sylvia Earle by Claire A. Nivola
Sylvia Earle first lost her heart to the ocean as a young girl when she discovered the wonders of the Gulf of Mexico in her backyard. As an adult, she dives even deeper. Whether she’s designing submersibles, swimming with the whales, or taking deep-water walks, Sylvia Earle has dedicated her life to learning more about what she calls “the blue heart of the planet.” With stunningly detailed pictures of the wonders of the sea, Life in the Ocean tells the story of Sylvia’s growing passion and how her ocean exploration and advocacy have made her known around the world. This picture book biography also includes an informative author’s note that will motivate young environmentalists.

optical illusionsOptical Illusions by DK Publishing
With the dynamic interactive Optical Illusions, each time readers turn the page, lift the flaps, or pull the tabs, they’ll be confronted with an even more amazing optical illusion!  This guide to the world of eye-tricks is fun for the entire family — providing new and gasp-inducing moments on each page. Along with the illusions, which include a spinning thaumatrope, a stereoscope, and an entrancing 3D sculpture that “follows” you around the room, readers will welcome learning the latest theories about why illusions fool us.  A great book for family sharing!

fairy tales from the brothers grimmFairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm: A New English Version by Philip Pullman
Two centuries ago, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published the first volume of Children’s and Household Tales. Now Philip Pullman makes us fall in love all over again with the immortal tales of the Brothers Grimm.  Pullman retells his fifty favorites, from much-loved stories like “Cinderella” and “Rumpelstiltskin” and “Rapunzel” to lesser-known treasures like “The Three Snake Leaves,” “Godfather Death” and “The Girl with No Hands.” At  the end of each tale he offers a brief personal commentary, opening a window on the sources of the tales, the various forms they’ve taken over the centuries and their everlasting appeal.
Suffused with romance and villainy, danger and wit, the Grimms’ fairy tales have inspired Pullman’s unique creative vision—and his beguiling retellings will draw you back into a world that has long cast a spell on the Western imagination.  A soon-to-be classic.

children's book a day almanacChildren’s Book-A-Day Almanac by Anita Silvey
Part fun- and information-filled almanac, part good book guide, the Children’s Book-a-Day Almanac is a new way to discover a great children’s book–every day of the year!  This fresh, inventive reference book is a dynamic way to showcase the gems, both new and old, of children’s literature. Each page features an event of the day, a children’s book that relates to that event, and a list of other events that took place on that day. Always informative and often surprising, celebrate a year of literature for children with The Children’s Book-a-Day Almanac.

brothers at batBrothers at Bat: The True Story of an Amazing All-Brother Baseball Team by Audrey Vernick, Illustrated by Steven Salerno
The Acerra family had sixteen children, including twelve ball-playing boys. It was the 1930s, and many families had lots of kids. But only one had enough to field a baseball team . . . with three on the bench! The Acerras were the longest-playing all-brother team in baseball history. They loved the game, but more important, they cared for and supported each other and stayed together as a team. Nothing life threw their way could stop them.  For any sports fan.

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And there you have it!  A dozen titles for holiday gift-giving (and/or reading!) Enjoy!

::Kelly::

More 2011 Awards!

The last post was getting a little long, so here are the last of the award winners for 2011!

Batchelder Award

The Batchelder Award is a citation awarded to an American publisher for a children’s book considered to be the most outstanding of those books originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States, and subsequently translated into English and published in the United States.

2011 Winner

A Time of Miracles written by Anne-Laure Bondoux, translated by Y. Maudet, published by Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House, Inc.

When Blaise turns seven years old, the Soviet Union collapses and Gloria decides that she and Blaise must flee the political troubles and civil unrest in Georgia. The two make their way westward on foot, heading toward France, where Gloria says they will find safe haven. But what exactly is the truth about Blaise’s past?
Bits and pieces are revealed as he and Gloria endure a five-year journey across the Caucasus and Europe, weathering hardships and welcoming unforgettable encounters with other refugees searching for a better life. During this time Blaise grows from a boy into an adolescent; but only later, as a young man, can he finally attempt to untangle his identity.

Batchelder Honor Books

Departure Time written by Truus Matti, translated by Nancy Forest-Flier, published by Namelos

Nothing written by Janne Teller, translated by Martin Aitken, published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division

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Belpre Award

The Pura Belpré Award is presented annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.

2011 Illustrator Award Winner

Grandma’s Gift illustrated  and written by Eric Velasquez, published by Walker Publishing Company, Inc., a division of Bloomsbury Publishing, Inc.

After they prepare their traditional Puerto Rican celebration, Eric and Grandma visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a school project, where he sees a painting by Diego Velasquez and realizes for the first time that he could be an artist when he grows up. Grandma witnesses his fascination, and presents Eric with the perfect Christmas gift—a sketchbook and colored pencils—to use in his first steps toward becoming an artist.

Honor Books

Fiesta Babies illustrated by Amy Córdova, written by Carmen Tafolla, published by Tricycle Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc.

Me, Frida illustrated by David Diaz, written by Amy Novesky, published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Abrams

Dear Primo: A Letter to My Cousin illustrated  and written by Duncan Tonatiuh, published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Abrams

2011 Author Award Winner

The Dreamer written by Pam Munoz Ryan, illustrated by Peter Sis, published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.

Respinning the childhood of the widely beloved poet Pablo Neruda, Ryan and Sís collaborate to create a stirring, fictionalized portrait of a timid boy’s flowering artistry. Young Neftalí Reyes (Neruda’s real name) spends most of his time either dreamily pondering the world or cowering from his domineering father, who will brook no such idleness from his son. In early scenes, when the boy wanders rapt in a forest or spends a formative summer by the seashore, Ryan loads the narrative with vivid sensory details. And although it isn’t quite poetry, it eloquently evokes the sensation of experiencing the world as someone who savors the rhythms of words and gets lost in the intricate surprises of nature.

Honor Books

Ole! Flamenco written by George Ancona, photographs by George Ancona, published by Lee & Low Books Inc.

The Firefly Letters: A Suffragette’s Journey to Cuba written by Margarita Engle, published by Henry Holt and Company, LLC

90 Miles to Havana written by Enrique Flores-Galbis, published by Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing

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Coretta Scott King Awards

Designed to commemorate the life and works of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and to honor Mrs. Coretta Scott King for her courage and determination to continue the work for peace, the Coretta Scott King Book Awards annually recognize outstanding books for young adults and children by African American authors and illustrators that reflect the African American experience.

Author Award

2011 Winner(s)

Winner image One Crazy Summer
by Rita Williams-Garcia, published by Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers

2011 Honor(s)

Winner image Lockdown
by Walter Dean Myers and published by Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers
Winner image Ninth Ward
by Jewell Parker Rhodes and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.
Winner image Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty
written by G. Neri, illustrated by Randy DuBurke and published by Lee & Low Books Inc.

Illustrator Award

2011 Winner(s)

Winner image Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave
illustrated by Bryan Collier, written by Laban Carrick Hill and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

2011 Honor(s)

Winner image Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow: A Story of the Young Jimi Hendrix
illustrated by Javaka Steptoe, written by Gary Golio and published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company