Kids Fiction about Bullying

Find all of the following books about bullies and bullying in the Juvenile Fiction section of the Library.

Also check out this excellent booklist, created by the Cooperative Children’s Book Council, separated by grade and perspective titled Thick-skinned, Thin-skinned, The Skin I’m In:  Books about Bullying, Teasing, Relational Aggression and School Violence

 

 

Clever Trevor by Sarah Albee (32 pages)

In an attempt to reclaim the playground, Trevor figures out how to use an uneven seesaw to teach Buzz and his bully buddies a lesson.

Never Swipe a Bully’s Bear by Katherine Applegate (79 pages)

When first-grader Roscoe discovers that his stuffed pig is missing from his backpack, he accuses the class bully of “pig-napping” and gets even by taking the bully’s teddy bear.’

Golden & Grey:  An Unremarkable Boy and a Rather Remarkable Ghost by Louise Arnold (267 pages)

When a downhearted ghost becomes the “invisible friend” of an eleven-year-old boy who is an outcast in his new school, the two help each other find their place in their respective worlds.

Blubber by Judy Blume (153 pages)

Jill goes along with the rest of the fifth-grade class in tormenting a classmate and then finds out what it’s like when she, too, becomes a target.

Bootsie Barker Ballerina by Barbara Bottner (Easy Reader)

Bernie and Lisa get even with Bootsie Barker, who is terrorizing their ballet class.

Cory Coleman, Grade 2 by Larry Dane Brimner (66 pages)

Seven-year-old Cory Coleman’s birthday party is ruined by the class bully, who turns out not to be such a bully in the end.

Just Kidding by Annie Bryant Beacon Street Girls #10 (240 pages)

The BSG and their classmates learn firsthand that gossip can spread quickly and cause a great deal of damage in its path.

Trading Places with Tank Talbott by Dori Hillestad Butler (139 pages)

Jason, who would rather work on his horror movie screenplay than learn to swim, finds an unlikely ally in Tank, the class bully, who is being forced to take ballroom dance lessons.

The New Girl by Meg Cabot (222 pages)

Guided by her rules, nine-year-old Allie works to get past being just the new girl at school, eagerly awaits the arrival of her kitten, and faces turmoil when her grandmother visits while the family is still settling into their new home.

Chrissa by Mary Casanova (123 pages)

Chrissa Maxwell moves to a new school in the middle of the year, and the girls in her fourth-grade class are decidedly unfriendly. On the advice of her grandmother, Chrissa tries first to be nice, and then to ignore the mean girls. But they just won’t quit, and when the teasing turns into serious bullying, Chrissa must find the courage to stand strong and speak out.

Chrissa Stands Strong by Mary Casanova (123 pages)

Chrissa Maxwell’s had a good summer, practicing for swim team tryouts. Then her world is shaken when she and her friends get mean text messages and there’s an accident at the pool. Can one girl put an end to the bullying?

The Present Takers by Aidan Chambers (156 pages)

Lucy is tormented by class bullies who demand that she bring them gifts.

Mitch and Amy by Beverly Cleary (222 pages)

Twins Mitch and Amy were always squabbling, but when the school bully started picking on them they had something in common, and they couldn’t waste time fighting with each other.

Jake Drake Bully Buster by Andrew Clements (73 pages)

When Jake was three years old at Miss Lulu’s Danity Diaper Day Care Center, what did he know about bullies? Nothing.  But he learned fast–too fast! Why? Because Jake is kind of smart, and he’s not a tattletale, and he doesn’t have a big brother to protect him…”

Vive la Paris by Esmé Raji Codell  (A Companion Novel to Sahara Special) (224 pages)

Fifth-grader Paris learns some lessons about dealing with bullies of all kinds as she wonders how to stop a classmate from beating up her brother at school and as she learns about the Holocaust from her piano teacher, Mrs. Rosen.

Bully Trouble by Joanna Cole (48 pages)

Arlo and Robby, finding themselves the victims of a neighborhood bully, work out a red-hot scheme for discouraging him.

Dog Sense by Sneed B. Collard III (176 pages)

After he and his mother move from California to Montana to live with his grandfather, thirteen-year-old Guy gradually adjusts to the unfamiliar surroundings, makes a friend, and learns to deal with a bully, with the help of his Frisbee-catching dog, Streak.

Medusa Jones by Ross Collins (134 pages)

In ancient Greece, Medusa Jones, a gorgon, and her friends, a minotaur and a centaur, are mocked and sneered at by the other Acropolis Academy children whose parents are kings and gods, but when they go on a school camping trip together, the “freaks” become true heroes.

The Monster’s Ring by Bruce Coville (105 pages)

A timid boy, eager to frighten the school bully on Halloween night, acquires a magic ring and the power to change himself into a hideous monster.

My Dog, Cat by Marty Crisp (106 pages)

Ten-year-old Abbie, bullied at school for being small, wants to get a big black dog, but two months of living with a little Yorkshire terrier changes his mind about a number of things.

King of the Kooties by Debbie Dadey (84 pages)

Nate’s new friend Donald is being teased by the meanest girl in fourth grade, but after several failed attempts, he comes up with a plan to make her stop.

Camp Sink or Swim by Gibbs Davis (58 pages)

In trouble at camp because he has bragged about his non-existent swimming abilities, eight-year-old Danny finds himself forming an unexpected alliance with the bully “Two Ton” Tonya.

Thank you, Lucky Stars by Beverly Donofrio (234 pages)

Ally has looked forward to a new school year, especially since she and her best friend, Betsy, have planned since kindergarten to sing in the fifth grade talent show, but Betsy has a new best friend and Ally, shy and prone to cry, is targeted by bullies and a strange new student who is looking for a friend.

Alien For Rent by Betsy Duffey (71 pages)

When a small fuzzy alien appears at their school, third graders J.P. and Lexie accidentally direct his powers against the bully Bruce and things get out of control.

How To Be Cool in the Third Grade by Betsy Duffey (71 pages)

When Robbie York is marked as a target by a bully at school, he decides that the only way to survive the third grade is by being cool.

Wonder Kid Meets the Evil Lunch Snatcher by Lois Duncan (76 pages)

Terrorized by an evil lunch-snatcher at his new school, Brian devises, with the help of a fellow comic book fan, a plan involving a new super hero called Wonder Kid.

Stinky Stern Forever by Michelle Edwards (49 pages)

Pa Lia and her classmates share memories of Stinky Stern, the second-grade bully.

Benjamin Dove by Friðrik Erlings (206 pages)

As an adult, Benjamin Dove looks back on a childhood summer that changed his life forever. Disturbing themes are explored, from bullying to child abuse to rivalry, yet there is always a sense of a child’s unbreakable spirit.

I am Jack by Susanne Gervay (126 pages)

Eleven-year-old Jack suffers terrible headaches as he worries that his grandmother will soon die, his mother’s boyfriend will move in–or leave–and especially that the school bully will get revenge for Jack’s ill-timed joke at his expense.

A Midsummer Night’s Dork by Carol Gorman (214 pages)

Jerry Flack, recently-elected sixth-grade president, organizes an Elizabethan festival at school but accepts a challenge from a bully that may mean he will once again be considered a “dork.”

Secrets at Camp Nokomis : a Rebecca Mystery by Jacqueline Dembar Greene(American Girl series) (170 pages)

When Rebecca attends summer camp in the country because of the spreading polio epidemic in New York City, she is troubled by a bully in her tent and another fellow camper who is strangely secretive.

Owen Foote, Frontiersman by Stephanie Greene (88 pages)

Second grader Owen Foote is looking forward to spending time with his friend Joseph in their tree fort, until some bullies visiting his neighbor, Mrs. Gold, threaten to wreck the fort.

Cougar by Helen V. Griffith (106 pages)

Starting a new life on a farm in the country, Nickel has to adjust to the attentions of a local bully and the appearances of a ghost horse that was supposed to have died in a fire.

Stepping on the Cracks by Mary Downing Hahn (216 pages)

In 1944, while her brother is overseas fighting in World War II, eleven-year-old Margaret gets a new view of the school bully Gordy when she finds him hiding his own brother, an army deserter, and decides to help him.

Ghosts in Fourth Grade by Constance Hiser (68 pages)

James and his friends turn the old Hathaway house into a haunted house to scare Mean Mitchell, the class bully, on Halloween night.

Pinky and Rex and the Bully by James Howe (40 pages)

Pinky learns the importance of identity as he defends his favorite color, pink, and his friendship with a girl, Rex, from the neighborhood bully.

The Spoon in the Bathroom Wall by Tony Johnston (134 pages)

Living in the boiler room of the school where her father is janitor seems normal to fourth grader Martha Snapdragon, until she has experiences with an evil principal, the class bully, and a mysterious giant spoon, all reminiscent of the Arthurian legends.

Kaline Klattermaster’s Tree House by Haven Kimmel (152 pages)

Third-grader Kaline’s father has gone somewhere and his mother can’t seem to keep everything straight, but the two brothers and one hundred dogs that live in his imaginary tree house–and his strange neighbor Mr. Osiris Putnaminski–help him cope with his father’s absence, his mother’s forgetfulness, and the bullies that torment him in school.

Radio Fifth Grade by Gordon Korman (179 pages)

Mayhem breaks out in the fifth grade when the Venice Menace bullies his classmates into letting him become a regular guest on “Kidsview,” the school’s radio program.

Thanks For Giving by Abby Klein (32 pages)

Freddy’s class is collecting canned goods for a Thanksgiving  food drive, but class bully, Max, forgets to bring one.

Bokuden and the Bully : a Japanese Folktale adapted by Stephen Krensky (Easy Reader)

Relates how Bokuden Tsukahara, the greatest swordsman of sixteenth-century Japan, deals with a boastful, bullying warrior during a ferry ride across a great river.

Louise Takes Charge by Stephen Krensky (80 pages)

Louise enlists the aid of everyone in her class and together they outwit Jasper the bully.

Camp Rules!  by Nancy Krulik (154 pages)

Katie discovers that the magic wind has followed her to summer camp when she suddenly turns into the baby raccoon she and a new friend have been secretly feeding, and then later gets an inside view of her cabin’s bully.

Leon and the Champion Chip by Allen Kurzweil (338 pages)

Employing scientific methods learned in Mr. Sparks’s class, fifth-grader Leon competes in a potato chip tasting contest and takes revenge against Lumpkin the bully.

Leon and the Spitting Image by Allen Kurzweil (301 pages)

Leon, a fourth grader at The Ethical School, tries to outwit the school bully and learn to sew for fanatical teacher Miss Cronheim, with unexpected help from his final project– a doll with magical powers.

Third Grade Bullies by Elizabeth Levy (57 pages)

Being short and having moved four times in the last three years makes Sally defensive, so although she tries to help a classmate stand up to two bullies, she gets off to a bad start in her new school.

Hot Hand : A Comeback Kids Novel by Mike Lupica (165 pages)

In the wake of his parents’ separation, ten-year-old Billy seems to have continual conflicts with his father, who is also his basketball coach, but his quiet, younger brother Ben, a piano prodigy, is having even more trouble adjusting, and only Billy seems to notice.

Three Rotten Eggs by Gregory Maguire (184 pages)

The students of Miss Earth’s class in rural Vermont experience an eventful spring when they become involved with a bullying new student, a competitive egg hunt, and genetically altered chicks.

Indigo’s Star by Hilary McKay (265 pages)

Spurred on by his youngest sister, Rose, twelve-year-old Indigo sticks up for himself and an American boy who has replaced him as the primary target of the school bullies.

Amelia’s Bully Survival Guide by Marissa Moss (40 pages)

As if science class isn’t enough to deal with — now Amelia has the class bully to face.  But Amelia isn’t going to let that get her down.

Tarantula Power! by Ann Whitehead Nagda (93 pages)

Forced to work with the class bully on a project to design a new breakfast cereal, Richard also tries to stop him from picking on second-graders by using tarantula power.

Roxie and the Hooligans by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (116 pages)

Roxie Warbler, the niece of a famous explorer, follows Uncle Dangerfoot’s advice on how to survive any crisis when she becomes stranded on an island with a gang of school bullies and a pair of murderous bank robbers.

Agnes Parker… Girl in Progress by Kathleen O’Dell (156 pages)

As she starts in the sixth grade, Agnes faces challenges with her old best friend, a longtime bully, a wonderful new classmate and neighbor, and herself.

Dear God, help!!! Love, Earl by Barbara Park (105 pages)

Tired of being pushed around by the class bully, Earl and two friends devise the perfect revenge.

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson (128 pages)

The life of a ten-year-old boy in rural Virginia expands when he becomes friends with a newcomer who subsequently meets an untimely death trying to reach their hideaway, Terabithia, during a storm.

The Field of the Dogs by Katherine Paterson (89 pages)

Josh, who has just moved to Vermont with his mother, stepfather, and new baby brother, must deal with the bullying of a neighbor boy and discovers that his dog, whom he hears talking with other dogs, is also facing a bully of his own.

Colder Than Ice by David Patneaude (168 pages)

Josh Showalter, an insecure and overweight sixth-grader, hopes for a new start when he transfers to a school in northern Idaho, but he and his new friends are soon the target of a cold-hearted bully.

Lacrosse Face Off by Stephanie Peters (116 pages)

Eleven-year-old Garry, embarrassed when his non-athletic brother joins his lacrosse team, faces a bigger problem when the team bully turns on both of them.

The Kidnappers: A Mystery by Willo Davis Roberts (137 pages)

No one believes eleven-year-old Joey, who has a reputation for telling tall tales, when he claims to have witnessed the kidnapping of the class bully outside their expensive New York City private school.

How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell  (115 pages)

Two boys set out to prove that worms can make a delicious meal.

Max Quigley : Technically Not a Bully by James Roy (202 pages)

After playing a prank on one of his “geeky” classmates, sixth-grader Max Quigley’s punishment is to be tutored by him.

The Boy Who Lost His Face by Louis Sachar (198 pages)

David receives a curse from an elderly woman he has helped his schoolmates attack, and he learns to regret his weakness in pandering to others for the sake of popularity before new friends and a very nice girl help him to be a stronger, more assertive person.

Veronica Ganz by Marilyn Sachs (134 pages)

Thirteen-year-old Veronica manages to bully everyone in her class, except for shrimpy Peter Wedemeyer who keeps taunting and outsmarting her at every opportunity.

Zoom! Boom! Bully by Jon Scieszka (Easy Reader)

Big Rig loves to smash items delivered to a construction site, including barrels, crates, tires, and even his own birthday presents.

The Outlaw Varjak Paw by SF Said (263 pages)

During a harsh winter, Varjak Paw, a cat with great powers, leads his companions as they search for food, elude dangerous gangs, and hope to locate a hidden city where they can all be safe.

Calvin Coconut:  Trouble Magnet by Graham Salisbury (152 pages)

Nine-year-old. Calvin catches the attention of the school bully on the day before he starts fourth grade, while at home, the unfriendly, fifteen-year-old daughter of his mother’s best friend has taken over his room.

Bully-Be-Gone by Brian Tacang (216 pages)

Budding-inventor Millicent Madding launches her latest invention to disastrous results, and she has only days to create an antidote before the local bullies wreak havoc and her dearest friendships are destroyed forever.

Shredderman by Wendelin Van Draanen (138 pages)

Fifth-grader Nolan Byrd, tired of being called names by the class bully, has a secret identity–Shredderman!

Bad Girls, Bad Girls, :  Whatcha Gonna Do? by Cynthia Voigt (442 pages)

As new ninth-graders eager only to survive high school, Mikey and Margalo must deal creatively with stolen money and cheating on the tennis courts.

Super Emma by Sally Warner (90 pages)

Third-grader Emma becomes a reluctant heroine when she defends a friend from the class bully.

First Grade King by Karen Lynn Williams (119 pages)

Relates the experiences first-grader Joey King has at school: making friends, learning to read, and dealing with the class bully.

Bad Girls by Jacqueline Wilson (163 pages)

Ten-year-old Mandy must endure torment from three nasty bullies in school, but she finds solace in a new friendship with an older girl.

The Life of Me: Enter at Your Own Risk by Henry Winkler and Lin Oliver (186 pages)

Hank must decide whether to attend tae kwon do or an after school reading program run by his favorite teacher, and when he meets an interesting girl at “Reading Gym,” he gets into a complicated situation that even has him lying to his father.

Beany and the Meany by Susan Wojciechowski (102 pages)

When Meany’s best friend Carol Ann pairs with the new girl at school to create a science project, Meany must work with Kevin the bully.

Winchell Mink: The Misadventure Begins by Steve Young (135 pages)

When a bullied eleven-year-old boy is transformed into his pet turtle, he finds himself catapulted on a series of bizarre adventures.

 

~Shannon

Advertisements

One thought on “Kids Fiction about Bullying

  1. I think The Bully on Barkham Street made the biggest impression on me about bullies…and it was mostly because thru the book I actually sympathised with Martin’s (the bully) point of view a lot of the time–which really surprised me! It’s a really good book for kids to get a realization that some kids have less than ideal home situations and take it out on other people.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s